When Justin Trudeau’s Liberals ran for federal office in 2015, one of their primary campaign promises was the legalization of marijuana, and a resulting reduction in organized crime. However, almost half a year after legalization, the non-government market is thriving, uninterrupted. Recent estimates indicate that this market is expected to control as much as 71% of cannabis sales in 2019. These numbers make it clear that Canadians are not impressed with the legal system, and that government action is likely necessary in order to rectify the situation.

Canadians Aren’t Buying From Government Dispensaries

Many Canadians hoped that legalization would make buying cannabis easier and more convenient. However, many have come to find the complete opposite to be true.

Dispensaries across the country have been plagued by product shortages and low-quality product. Retailers and producers have severely underestimated the amount of demand for legal cannabis products. As a result, many consumers have been unable to purchase legal marijuana, and some dispensaries have been forced to temporarily shut down.

Moreover, the quality of dispensary weed has repeatedly come into question. Many have come to find that this weed is dry and harsh after being stored for unknown amounts of time in preparation for sale. Furthermore, after the sale of numerous contained samples, concerns have also arisen over mold and bacteria contamination.

Canadians have also been highly critical of the prices being charged for these cannabis products. According to one recent study, the average price of dried weed has increased by 15% since legalization. Not only that, but government dispensaries are not offering Canadians the same bulk discounts as non-government retailers.

With this weed being of lower quality and higher price, it is no surprise that most Canadian cannabis consumers are rejecting it.

Market Analysts Don’t Expect Things To Change

Things are not expected to change anytime soon. When it comes to legalization, the government’s responsibilities are numerous. Provincial and federal costs related to policing, education, and health-care have left precious little resources for the dismantling of the long running non-governmental cannabis market. Moreover, many analysts believe that provinces are making little, if any, profit from legalization. This has resulted in a shortage of funds with which to address this market.

The legalization of edibles, topicals, infused beverages, and concentrates later this year is expected to alleviate the problem somewhat. However, experts are convinced that the non-governmental cannabis market is not going anywhere. For what it’s worth, many Canadians don’t want it to.

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